HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're

Posted by: Vermont

HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/30/08 04:54 PM

These words all sound alike BUT they are not interchangeable.

In their haste, some of the greatest critics of everything else on this FORUM also have an annoying tendancy to use these three words as if they were synonyms - they are not:

There is an adverb specifying a place; it can also be an expletive. Adverb: Sylvia is lying there unconscious. Expletive: There are two Comps left to find for the BPO.

Their is a possessive pronoun. Fred and Sylvia finally completed their BPO. They were later than usual with their submission today.

They're is a contraction of they are. Fred and Sylvia will soon find that they're going to be docked for their tardiness. They're going to be very cranky !

Just an observation.

P.S. Fred and Sylvia are fictitious REALTORS®
Posted by: Delicious Cake

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/30/08 06:02 PM

Thank you!

They're, their and there used improperly is a huge pet peeve of mine!
Posted by: Ben34105

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/30/08 11:18 PM

I use this to help me remember!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfRJDNvTJd0
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/30/08 11:32 PM

anyone for "to", "too", or "two"?
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/30/08 11:48 PM

Ones that annoy me when used improperly:

where, wear

here, hear

allowed, aloud

alter, altar

bare, bear

Best one though was spotted on my own MLS - dopey agent said that the property was by the water damn.



I hate it. I worked hard to learn this stuff in grammar school and I resent that others got away with not learning it. LOL
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/31/08 08:52 AM

As we all know spell check won't fix the problem!
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/31/08 09:01 AM

Thank you for revealing that I have Company in this regard. Advice and advise are two others that are often abused/misused; even though they are not quite homonyms.

Because this FORUM is relied on as a site for novices to seek information from experts. It grieves me when people switch the two words:

People here often advise (verb) others who are seeking their advice (noun).

They should never be swapped out . . . . at least not by the "experts".
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/31/08 09:30 AM

I think proper word usage is an indication of responsibility and carefulness...but I realize there are many who disagree with me.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/31/08 01:16 PM

The problem is spell check so they appear correct.

Anyone got a suggestion on when to use "to and too". I know I get that one wrong.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/31/08 05:15 PM

Hello Dayton: Do we have a Spell Check on this FORUM ? All it can do is verify that a word is "valid" even though it may still be "incorrect" in that situation.

Regarding the dreadful to, too, and two issue; How about:

"I used to have two Wives; but that was just too much !"

to: works as part of the infinitive form of a verb - to swim, to ride, to write; or as a preposition meaning 'in the direction of' or 'towards' - to the store, give it to Jim, I'm going to bed.

two: the name of the number 2; it acts as an adjective in sentences.

too: is an adverb with two different uses. 1) meaning more than enough, an extra amount - too much money, too difficult, too many BPOs; 2) meaning also or as well as - I am going, too. Give me some bread, too.

After all that, I am now just too tired to submit those two BPOs !
Posted by: Rebekah

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 09:08 AM

I agree - make sure that you are using the right word for the right situation! Using "too" instead of "to" or "their" instead of "there" is sure way to lose clients! For me, whenever I see an error like that, I wonder about what other simple errors that person is making. It really helps your authenticity and credibility by making sure spelling and grammar are correct.

Another word pair that people misuse is "your" and "you're":

Your (possessive) = "This is your house"

You're (contraction, short for "You are") = "You're the best!"
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 09:36 AM

Thanks Rebekah, for keeping this thread alive. Over the past couple weeks, I have become convinced that some of the very brightest people were allowed to skip a grade in Grammar School (2nd or 3rd) where these elements were taught; and they never thought they missed something. And no one ever had guts enough to correct the otherwise intelligent people . . . . so now here they are at age 50 or so, and are unknowingly making a first impression that is so contrary to what they have to offer. Sad, isn't it ?

There is an amazing list of homonyms compiled by Alan Cooper located at:

http://www.cooper.com/alan/homonym_list.html which contains:

706 Sets of Homonyms involving 1529 Individual Words

In the practice of Real Estate, another current mis-use is:

cited - meaning referenced, often legally;

sighted- meaning visually identified; and

sited- meaning located.

Homonyms would drive me crazy if I wasn't already there !

Thanks again.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 10:41 AM

Raze & raise are two more.

The old building needs to be razed.
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 10:59 AM

A recent misuse of "site", it should have been "cite", also reminded me of "sight".

Just noticed there was an earlier post of the past tense version of this.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 02:29 PM

Another pair I see misused all the time is "loose" and "lose."

If that loose button isn't fixed, I will lose my slacks.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 03:04 PM

Since you bring it up neudot, pair itself is often a problem child:

pair- a set of two;

pare- cutting down or removing the skin;

pear- bottom-heavy fruit.

I'm going to pare a pair of pears before I eat them !

HOMONYMS - why they're all around us ! It's scary; but I don't want to be gettin' some kind of PHOBIA about it. Here in Vermont, that would be very bad for business !
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 06:16 PM

I'd like to accept a couple more orders.... except that it is the weekend.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 08:37 PM

NOW I CAN’T RESIST TELLING MY NEW HOMONYM FRIENDS ABOUT HOWARD DEAN using Cite, Site and Sight.

When he was our Governor, Howard saw a new Comfort Inn being built on a SITE at Exit 20 of Interstate-91, and he then decided he didn’t want to see anything Commercial along the Interstate. He thought this damaged the bucolic or rustic character of Vermont and its Tourist Industry.

So before he left Office, Howard Dean had a Law passed that we must Cite informing Prospective Developers that they cannot commercially develop any Site that happens to be within Sight of any Interstate CloverLeaf, or Exit Ramp in Vermont. Just a little reduction in the value of the Commercial Development Rights by Edict ! How would that go over in your Jurisdiction ? This is just a little Real Estate related homonym exercise on Cite, Site, and Sight.

Absolutely no political comment is intended.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/13/08 09:54 PM

Quote:
Absolutely no political comment is intended.


Of course not! I never thought such a thing! wink

Nice homonymisms! (if that's not a real word, it should be...)

Anyone ever get into Sniglets? I love Sniglets. I make up my own all the time.
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/14/08 01:18 AM

And then we have the lone loan company that would even consider the purchaser for qualification.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/14/08 09:37 AM

^^there is a street near me called Lone Oak Road, and of course, some doofus put it up on the MLS as Loan Oak Road.
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/19/08 10:46 PM

I thought maybe Jenifer would remind us of her book about soul (not to be cofused with sole).
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/20/08 05:56 AM

They just keep on coming !

Yesterday someone in MLS told us about a fanciful Mini-Farm which even had a Chicken Coupe'. (Like in BMW, instead of that plain kind of Coop for Poultry)

Then, the same day, a New Salesperson emails me a question on before"How many Daze until the Buyer's Deposit is Dew ?" A two-fer Sentence. (There's more to say about Do, Due and Dew.)

I am even more convinced that these otherwise Intelligent People were allowed to skip 3rd Grade; and NEVER LEARNED what they missed, and no one has had guts enough to tell them.

I know they all don't use a Dictaphone™ ? (Am I dating myself ?)
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/20/08 08:02 AM

Here's another one from just the past 24 hours . . . . from right here on this FORUM:

Dual - two things; twofold; double; (like a Dual Exhaust System, or Dual Processors)

Duel - a formal fight over honor (often with Swords, or Pistols, or SlingShots)

"As a Dual Agent, I had a Mental Duel going on in my head between my competing Fiduciary Responsibilities . . . . Now I'm Bi-Polar." I'll never do that again !
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/22/08 12:42 PM

They keep on coming ! Just this Morning:

"I am aloud to say this because of my past experience in . . . . whatever."

Allowed - permitted

Aloud - spoken

This is the United States of America; so I am allowed to say whatever I want; but it is best that I do not speak many of my thoughts aloud and keep them to myself.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 03:09 PM

Also related to the practice of Real Estate is the following pair, which I just saw mis-used this morning in: "I am going to council my Sellers to ....." It should be "counsel".

Counsel - As a noun, an Advisor or Consultant, like an Attorney or an Accountant; or as a Verb, to provide advice of a confidential and/or professional nature.

Council - A Noun describing a group of Leaders, like the Council of Nicea or the President's Council of Economic Advisors.

From a Private Message, I understand that my link to Alan Cooper's list of 706 Homonym Sets involving 1529 separate Words is not working. The followng link should work better:

http://www.cooper.com/alan/homonym_list.html
Posted by: tired

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 03:26 PM

Choose and Chose
A lot and allot
Stationary and Stationery
Aisle and isle
Weather and whether
Weigh and way
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 03:51 PM

Cemetery, not cemetary.

Independent - not independant.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 03:52 PM

Another one I see a lot is LOOSE instead of LOSE.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 04:11 PM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Cemetery, not cemetary.



Whats the difference? I consider both to be a place to bury a body? Do Tell Perky.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 04:28 PM

It's unfortunate; but I see so many Brand New 911 Street Signs, paid for with your Tax Dollars from Homeland Security and mis-spelling Cemetery (among other things). You would think they'd have a spell-check at Homeland Security; but it's probably in a crate rusting away down in Louisiana !

With Cemetary, I think that one is just a lost cause. It's not a Homonym; Cemetary is just a plain old fashioned mis-spelling that has been tolerated. (Websters has not accepted it, yet)

I hope I get to go to a Cemetery that is spelled correctly !

At least no one on this FORUM is mixing it up with "Seminary"

As an aside, I've always wondered how much confusion was present at the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg because there was a Seminary Ridge to the North West of the Battlefield and a Cemetery Ridge going off to the South. By "confusion", I mean DEATH because the wrong word was uttered or was mis-understood in the heat of the Battle. Maybe someone on this FORUM knows ? Just words; but words matter !
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/24/08 06:31 PM

Originally Posted By: REODayton
Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Cemetery, not cemetary.



Whats the difference? I consider both to be a place to bury a body? Do Tell Perky.


They're not homonyms as Vermont stated. It's just that cemetery is often misspelled as cemetary. The same with independent (correct) and independant.
Posted by: Laure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/25/08 11:17 AM

Here's an advanced topic: its and it's.

"It's" is ALWAYS a contraction of "it is" or "it has". The apostrophe should never be used in the possessive "its", as in "its roof needs to be replaced".

To remember this one, just recall that we use "his" and not "hi's", so it is "its" and not "it's" for possessives.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/08 05:09 PM

I didn't know it was a Homonym until I saw it here yesterday:

Breech - the back part, or rear end. It was a Breech Birth because the Fetus presented its rear end instead of its head.

Breach - to break through. Like to breach the Terms of a Contract. The opening created in a Marriage by a Breach of Trust. A void to be filled. My Seller committed a serious breach of our Listing Agreement.
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/08 07:28 PM

Just noticed on one of the other forums that someone asking a question that should have been " ... whether ..." was actually getting answers to what they asked for: "weather"
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/08 07:41 PM

I'm surprised at how many people also routinely substitute the word "Wether" which is a Castrated Buck Goat or a Ram Sheep. Just like a Gelding, a Hog, or a Steer, i.e. without the Rocky Mountain Oysters.
Posted by: CanDo

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/08 11:26 PM

I am stupid, but please tell me what are 911 Homeland Security Street signs? I haven't seen them and I don't think (and I could be wrong) they're making their way to California.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/08 04:18 PM

Originally Posted By: CanDo
I am stupid, but please tell me what are 911 Homeland Security Street signs? I haven't seen them and I don't think (and I could be wrong) they're making their way to California.


STUPID ? . . . . Hardly ! You and some of the other Posters here possess some of the “Brightest Minds” I have seen anywhere; and some, including you, are pretty articulate too !

I think most of you just operate in a more sophisticated environment than we who operate in more of a back-woods setting. Your Communities probably did not need very much help from Homeland Security or the Office of Domestic Preparedness.

Now, I don’t want to HIJACK my own Topic Here in the backwaters of Vermont, and in many other rural areas of the Country, the delivery of Emergency and Public Safety Services had been hampered by a lack of a reliable and uniform addressing system. People die because Service Providers don’t know how to find them, and would often get lost in the woods !

In the case of Vermont, many of our back roads were completely without any kind of addressing whatsoever, and seldom were there any Road Signs. Even worse, when we did have signs, the names of the roads would read one name at the East end and a completely different name at the West end . . . . and maybe a few other names thrown in-between for good measure. It certainly helped keep Tourists from finding the FSBOs.

Some locals used to tell me gleefully that “Well, If people need a sign to tell them where they are; then probably they don’t have any business being here anyway !” Often where we did have signs, they had a very short life expectancy and would be removed by the Locals or Stolen by the Flatlanders as Collectors Items because of the sometimes unusual rustic or bucolic names.

After 9/11/2001, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and its predecessors, along with the Department of Transportation (DOT), the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), The Department of Justice (DOJ), the Office for Domestic Preparedness (ODP) and a few others seriously started cooperating to create a comprehensive Emergency 911 (or Enhanced 911) E-911 to fully implement this kind of consistent and electronic methodology everywhere in the United States. Over 12 Billion Dollars has been spent on this E-911 initiative, including the So-Called Reverse-911 function.

Much of this money (your money) has been awarded to Regional, State and Local Authorities to help deploy a consistent Mapping and Street Naming convention. A very small portion of those Grants also went to help Communities pay for consistent Road Name “Signs” like I spoke of in an earlier Post (in a not-so-nice manner). This NationWide E-911 System is all supposed to foster National Safety and Security, Economic Prosperity, and the delivery of Critical Social Services through telecommunications.

As a bi-product of this Fancy-Schmancy Nationwide Addressing and Mapping System, our favorite BPO Companies are now able to precisely measure how far the Comps are from the Subject ! Man, have we got it together now or what ? That certainly makes it all so worth while !

I hope that this helps CANDO. You probably already have a satisfactory E-911 System that fits into the Federal E-911 Program and didn't know it. Any more discussion definitely requires starting a “New Topic” !

Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/08 04:38 PM

My old address at home used to be:

RD #1, Box 33 (Rural Delivery Route 1)

Only the post office and UPS knew where that was.

When I got married it was

RR2 Box 286 (Rural Route 2)

Now, it is this:

HC 1 Box 21 (Highway Commercial Route 1)

I have a heck of a time when ordering things online, convincing them that this was indeed a PHYSICAL ADDRESS, not a post office box.

I have a small post office nearby (it closes for lunch every day) and the postmaster used to get irritated if I got a package addressed to #21 Williams Road to make the online people happy and have them send it to me; he will cross it out and write, in red, HC#1!!!! IT's not like he doesn't know where it is, for Pete's sake...it's right by the post office...

Someday soon it will say 21 Williams Road, but I'm not holding my breath....
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/08 04:52 PM

I'm doing just what I didn't want to do; Hijacking my own Topic.

Perky, if Williams Road is an accepted 911 Road, and 21 is a 911 Address:

Your driveway is exactly 110.88 Feet from the commencement of Williams Road. Under 911, each increment is exactly 5.28'.

One mile onto Williams Road is 1000. One half mile is 500. It's so simple, even a Real Estate Agent can find you ! You just have to know which end is the beginning of the Road/Street/Lane/Etc.

I've sold houses at intersections that had one 911 Address and the new Owners would put in a New Garage and Driveway coming off the other opposing road, and obviously, their 911 Address would change to some number appropriate for their positioning on the road that now had the Driveway. That Old address disappears into MLS Oblivion !

Watch out that you local USPS Person doesn't "Go Postal' on you !

Ask your Town Clerk or City Manager WHO the 911 Coordinator is for your Municipality. It's worth while making sure you have a permanent 911 Address before spending much money on expensive stationery (a homonym !); just to bring this back on Topic.
Posted by: CanDo

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/08 06:49 PM

Thank you for your reply and explanation. It makes all kinds of sense. I can imagine that natives of Vermont are a little put off by this.

Unfortunately, I live in a backwater county and I'm pretty sure that we do not have an adequate 911 mapping system. In fact, I have yet to find any mapping system that works with any real degree of success for my county. It's largely unincorporated and there is little mail delivery to boot!
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/08 07:55 PM

Ya'll might find this blog amusing. I was LOL at a lot of the entries.

http://englishfail.wordpress.com

I liked the Slipper Floor one, and the best one:

NO PARKING!
VIOLATORS WILL BE TOWED
AND FIND $50!

(yes, it's a REAL sign!)
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/13/08 08:54 PM

In this business, we shouldn't be mixing these two up; but we do:

Principal - A Person who is representative such as the head of school or an Agency.

Principle - a causative force; or a fundamental truth.

Your Principal Broker should be a person with high principles.

That Agency's Principal Broker doesn't have any principles; he'll gyp his own Agents just as fast as he'll cheat a stranger !

An easy way to distinguish is to remember that your Principal Broker should always be your "Pal" ! So should your School Principal or a Principal in the next Transaction.
Posted by: FL_Agent

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/29/08 04:55 PM

How about effect and affect.

This one confuses me...
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/29/08 08:06 PM

I thought for sure we had dealt with these two above; but I couldn't see them. I think they cause everyone to pause a moment before choosing which to use:

affect - to change, to influence, or to alter.

effect - the result or product of some force.

The high price of Gasoline has finally affected the number of miles Americans drive.

The effect of an over-supply of REOs has been downward pressure of Real Estate prices overall.

As an Agent of change I have had an effect on the local economy; but it has not affected my ego.
Posted by: Margaritaville

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/29/08 08:23 PM

Really great website:

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/affect-versus-effect.aspx

Grammar Girl explains it all.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/30/08 10:36 AM

but and butt- You smell like butt, but I like it.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/30/08 11:56 AM

i'm worried about you....

now, I seriously have to get work done or i'll lose all my clients!
Posted by: TB in TX

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/30/08 06:12 PM

"Affect" and "effect" are another pair...
(may have already been said)
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/01/08 09:23 AM

Coarse - An Adjective; Rough, not smooth. Lacking in refinement.

Until you get to know him, his coarse personality conceals a kind soul beneath that rough exterior.

After a weekend of not shaving, my beard is so coarse that it breaks the razor !

Course - A Noun; Path of travel, or a sequence of topics required to learn a Subject.

I just took a Course in How to handle Rich Demented Customers. It granted 12 C.E. Credits.

The Golf Course was so complicated; My Crazy Customer got lost on the 19th hole and failed to appear at the Closing. I should have taken that C.E. Course earlier ! I would have kept a tighter rein on him !

Courtesy of Auburn CA, Here's the Sign that prompted this entry:

I suppose most Golfers would already know how to spell COURSE; but evidently the "Approved" RE/Max Sign Maker doesn't have software to check for Homonyms BEFORE committing to paint these Sign Toppers with the wrong word.



It may be that this Georgia Country Club just happens to be a Very Coarse Course ! (i.e. a very rough one) Always bring extra Balls because they will be worn down a whole lot in the course of 18 coarse holes ! After a round on the Coarse Course, you can relax in the Club House with some of their famed CousCous.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/01/08 10:26 AM

Golf and Gulf: Properly pronounced, I don't think these are actually homonyms; regional dialects may make them sound identical. At the request of swflagent:

Golf - A Noun that describes a goofy Ancient Scottish game that is played with Clubs (originally carried by the invading Vikings), the purpose of which is to sequentially knock hard little balls into 9 or 18 strategically located holes along a predetermined Course. Originally invented for Agents to casually talk about opportunities in Real Estate to potential Buyers and Sellers in a setting where they cannot just walk away.

I just came in from playing a round of Golf on the Coarse Course. I enjoy playing Golf along the Gulf . . . . in between Hurricanes !

Gulf - A Noun; a body of water (in an Ocean) that is larger than a Bay or Eddy. A gap, a chasm or an abyss; a cleavage (!)

I went fishing for Swordfish in the Deep Blue Waters of the Gulf with my Demented Rich Client. I had to watch him closely so he wouldn't fall overboard !

There is such a chasm between the Asking Price and the Buyer's Offer, I thought the whole deal would fall into the Gulf ! I like to tell Sellers that "You respond like this and the whole deal is dropping into an Abyss of no return !" Maybe I'll try Gulf for a change.
Posted by: Alabama

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/03/08 10:37 PM

Pain, Payne, Pane

Just saw "double payne windows"

I got a pain in the head when Mr. Payne noticed the foggy panes of glass.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/04/08 09:00 AM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ArIwLZ8LI4
Found this video a few days ago and laughed so hard.... It seems to fit well here.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/30/08 12:24 PM

A young Agent just listed a $2,000,000 Dairy Farm and distributed a special Flyer to all the Agencies in Northern Vermont and New Hampshire (even though the place is in MLS).

I was impressed that, as she explains it, the place is Turn-Key with Barns and all equipment to handle a "Heard" of 350 Milking Holsteins. I don't have guts enough to correct her as I'd imagine most Dairy Men will know, especially if they have $2 Mil to invest in the Milk Business, so I'm just posting it on this special Homonym Thread:

Heard - having been listened to

Herd - a group of ruminants

The "fix" to MLS is easy. But I'm surprised someone didn't proof read the copy before heavy duty money was spent printing the fancy Flyers/Mailers.

Some might think she just hasn't spent much time around Cows before ? Sad.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/02/08 10:08 PM

I've seen a couple of Coy Ponds in listings.

Ummm...it's koi. Unless the pond is somehow sneaky.
Posted by: CanDo

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/08/08 04:10 AM

Let's not forget sheer and shear...if you don't know the difference, I really can't help you but perhaps you know some sheep who might laugh

What prompted this is.....

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/090708dnmetgrammar.11a3a15.html
Posted by: jbt4re

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/08/08 07:42 AM

Using Sell for Sale:

"For Sell", as in "Our house is for sell!"

It should be "For Sale"

At first I thought it was a regional thing, but I've see it used in other areas of the US.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/08/08 08:52 AM

How can I join the Typo Eradication Advancement League? What a great sounding organization!!!!!
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/24/08 01:07 PM

Here are a couple that I had not seen confused before this week:

Waste - To make ill use of; to make worthless.

Driving those Buyers around today was an absolute waste of both My Time and My Gas. They could not focus; just wanted to know where the Fast Food Joints were.

Waist - That area between the Ribs and the Hips

At least they bought me a Coffee while they ate a Big Mac™. That Big Mac™ must have gone straight to the Buyer's waist; just like the couple hundred that she'd obviously eaten previously.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/24/08 01:26 PM

The one my wife has trouble with is wait (male) and wait (female) and weight.

I will wait on her- 2 minutes then I am ready.

She will wait on me- When ever I feel like coming home.

8 years ago I promised to quit smoking, she promised to lose a few pounds. I will wait until she losses her weight then I will quit smoking. I choose to wait until she looses the weight.

and she confuses model and model. I bought the outfit for the model to medel it, not for you to model it.

And one other Bit** and B*t*h. I said I do not want to hear you Bit** here, go else where, I did not say you were a B*t*h.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 06:00 PM

They just keep on coming . . . . these Homonyms are multiplying! Here's one I hadn't noticed before today right here on this Board (when it should have been "bored"):

board - a milled plank of wood or other substances; or a group of people on a committee.

bored - disinterested; inattentative; mind-wandering; or something which has had a hole drilled into it.

In 5th Grade I was bored out of my mind until the Teacher hit me upside the head with a 2X4 board and woke me up . . . . real good !

Several years ago, business was slow and I was so bored, I became President of my Local Board of REALTORS® to occupy my time.

While I'm in this area, here are a few other boring Homonyms that are close by:

boar - a wild pig; or an un-neutered Male Swine

Boer - a South African of Dutch descent

boor - a tasteless buffoon

bore - as a verb, to drill a hole; as a noun, an un-interesting tedious person.

(I will try to use all four (4) in one sentence in the next 360 Minutes. What a bore !)

A couple Homonyms which are more specifically related to Real Estate are:

border - the boundary or perimeter of a Country, or of a parcel of land (or maybe a piece of cloth).

boarder - a person whose rent includes both Lodging AND Meals.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 06:33 PM

Have you ever eaten a buffoon? How do you know how it tastes?
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 06:55 PM

Tastes just like a Punchinello; but not so Spicey ! Maybe a Poltroon.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 07:05 PM

I heard they actually taste like chicken.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 08:07 PM

I'm going to have to take you to Chef's College in Vermont. These Tasteless Buffoons taste like Tofu . . . . Like Nothin'! When I really have a hankering for "Tasteless", I saute' myself up a batch of diced Cardboard (back on Topic !) in Salt-Free Lard. I call that one Blase' Scaramouche* ala Perky ! Really quite nutritious.

* I do so hope that none of this is found to be offensive to the real Buffoons, Poltroons, Punchinellos or Scaramouches among the Readers. Any similarity is purely intentional.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 08:17 PM

I loathe diced cardboard!
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 08:22 PM

Earlier to day I though I should post HIRE (to employ)
and higher (as physically located above).

Wish I could remember others that I thought of when I wasn't near the computer!
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 08:31 PM

You're doing good Mr. F. We needed something to break this talk of boring food. I was just about to tell Perky that I've been some places where people flavored the fried diced CardBoard with ToothPaste out of the CARE Packages. In spite of the Financial MeltDown, we've still got it pretty good !
Posted by: FL_Agent

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 08:51 PM

Originally Posted By: Vermont007


* I do so hope that none of this is found to be offensive to the real Buffoons, Poltroons, Punchinellos or Scaramouches among the Readers. Any similarity is purely intentional.


Now I'm lost and too lazy to look them up!
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 09:14 PM

A poltroon should never be confused with a pontoon.
Posted by: VirtualAdmin

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 10:52 PM

Grown - advanced in growth: a grown boy.
Groan - to utter a deep, mournful sound expressive of pain or grief.

I saw a listing that had "in-grown pool" in the description. Cracked me up.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/27/08 11:13 PM

rofl - in grown pool! though it they're not taken care of they can be a curse like an ingrown toenail! LOL
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 10/26/08 04:38 PM

I'm surprised I haven't seen these two confused here before today:

Waive – to voluntarily give up a right or privilege; to defer or postpone; to forfeit.

Wave – an undulating motion made by an object; a signal made by swinging one’s hand or arm; the vibration of particles for communication; a surge or crest representing a temporary increase in volume.

We have had a wave of Murder Suspects recently who refuse to waive their right to have an Attorney present while being questioned.

My Customer has waived his right to independent representation; so he WILL NOT become a Client of anyone, and will represent himself. Then he waved Good Bye.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 10/26/08 06:01 PM

Perimeter A closed curve bounding a plane area. I walked the perimeter (around the outside edges) of my newly purchased acreage.

Parameter Limits or boundaries; guidelines. I try to keep my BPO orders within 20% GLA, five years of age, same construction style.
Posted by: barb43

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 10/27/08 12:02 AM

Not quite homonyms, but our MLS folks did give my partner a smothering spell when they turned his remark that the property has a privet hedge for added privacy into has a private hedge for added privacy. He called them up and explained, in great detail, what a privet hedge looks like.
Posted by: stellargellar

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/16/08 11:11 PM

haha these are very helpful. :)
i find it hard to control myself from correcting people too much.
this should help me control myself more. (knowing information such as this is disseminated) :D
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/25/08 08:28 PM

Ok One more:

Polish- a Nationality
polish- a cleaning process

I sent an email requesting the polish guy do some work and they sent a Polish guy who had no idea what I was talking about.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/09 10:55 AM

I just saw a New Land Listing whose "Deed has a claws in it against Mobile Homes" !

Claws - Big Fingernails or Toenails;

Clause - Contractual unit or phrase;

Claus - Fat, jolly guy with presents.

I suppose they meant a Restrictive Covenant prohibiting Mobile Homes; but I caught the gist of it anyway.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/09 08:00 PM

ROFL!!!!!!!

That is TOOOOOOO funny.
Posted by: Mr. Foreclosure

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/09 10:19 PM

Dale might want to include Klaus, not sure but I think it is German.

I noticed as I was typing a post earlier this evening that I nearly said hire (as to employ) but caught myself in time to write higher (as at a greater altitude).
Posted by: allREOpreserv

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/09 10:39 AM

Adventurous ~ willing to try new things

Adventuress ~ willing to take advantage of new men

Sorry, guys. Couldn't help myself ~ a friend sent this to me and I just HAD to post it. LOL

Linda
Posted by: Pikes Peak

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/09 03:15 PM

Here's one I've been guilty of. (my excuse is that english is not my native language, but we do have a Weihnachtsmann aka Santa Klaus)

Mute
Moot
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/09 06:25 PM

When I was growing up (and still am), we actually celebrated Saint Nicholas Day, on December 6th. Slowly, with the western commercialization of Christmas, Old Saint Nick has slowly been transformed from Saint Nicholas to Santa Niclaus to Santa Claus or Santa Klaus.

The Original Gift Giving Bishop of Myra (270-346 A.D.) has been pretty much totally repackaged by Coca-Cola as something quite a bit different from his origins. Now even his name has been boiled down,(whether it's with a "C" or a "K" doesn't matter), and his "Day" isn't even worth mentioning on modern Calendars.

Just a little tidbit I thought I'd toss out on behalf of the Old Geezer ! I'm probably the only one here who ever celebrated the Real St. Nick's Day.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/09 06:49 PM

I didn't know there was an actual St. Nick's day. I knew the original story about the real St Nick, but had no idea that he had a special day.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/09 07:14 PM

His problem was probably being assigned a Day that was simply too close to Christmas, so he got himself smooshed right into that whirlwind heyday that some now refer to as XMAS. Sad, ain't it ?

Google "Saint Nicholas" if you have a moment . . . . there he is !

Identity Theft . . . . Big Time.
Posted by: Pikes Peak

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/09 10:54 AM

"Klaus" is actually a name, I made up the rest. Here is the real story for St. Nikolaus:

SANKT NIKOLAUS-ABEND and SANKT NIKOLAUS-TAG (Saint Nicholast Eve and Saint Nicholas Day) December 5, 6

The Yuletide season opens officially on December 5, Saint Nicholas Eve, or on the morning of December 6, when the good saint appears in person in many towns and villages and calls on the children. Saint Nicholas (or, in some places, his assistant, Knecht Rupprecht, or Christkindle or Kriss Kringle) usually is regarded as a pre-Christmas messenger who examines the youngsters' behavior. He promises gifts of toys and sweets if the children are good. If they are bad, however, he flourishes bundles of birch rods and threatens punishment unless naughty ways are mended. Sometimes he reminds children of their waywardness by presenting little bundles of twigs, either real or of candy.

In some places children place a shoe or a large stocking beside the bed or outside the door. Saint Nicholas then leaves a small gift or a bundle of rods, to remind the little ones of their behavior--good or bad.

On Saint Nicholas Eve, in the Rhineland and in northern Germany, the holiday Spekulatius makes its first appearance. Spekulatius is traditional hard gingerbread which is made in molds to represent Saint Nicholas, little men, or animals. Sometimes, also, it comes in thin, yard-long loaves.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/09 11:38 AM

I better change my ways. I yell at the kids every year for bringing sticks into house, they deny it, and I clean up the mess. Perhaps St Nik has been checking up on me.
Posted by: Pikes Peak

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/28/09 12:00 PM

I don't know if I've seen this one, if yes, bring out the sticks.

Do you live in a Dwelling?
I keep Dwelling on it.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/28/09 12:43 PM

Originally Posted By: pikes peak
I don't know if I've seen this one, if yes, bring out the sticks.

Do you live in a Dwelling?
I keep Dwelling on it.


I always have sticks and rocks show up in my house. My son picks up everything. Yesterday he had a pile of diamonds he found at school in his pocket (it turned out to be rock salt). His grandpa does alot of wood work and reuses stuff, very creative type, that must be where the boy gets it from.

This past christmas he wanted to make give his own gifts which consisted of sticks and stones in a box and wrapped in newspaper. Perhaps its art, perhaps he is concerned about the environment at the ripe age of 4, he was proud though. I just shrug my shoulders and say thanks.
Posted by: barb43

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/28/09 10:27 PM

Quote:
I'm probably the only one here who ever celebrated the Real St. Nick's Day.


Nope. My little Polish Catholic mother-in-law insisted we celebrate St. Nick's day every year! We had a ball doing this, after she moved here from Milwaukee. In their family, they did stockings on St. Nick's day and then had regular Christmas present opening on Christmas Eve.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/01/09 06:53 AM

Originally Posted By: barb43
Nope. My little Polish Catholic mother-in-law insisted we celebrate St. Nick's day every year! We had a ball doing this, after she moved here from Milwaukee. In their family, they did stockings on St. Nick's day and then had regular Christmas present opening on Christmas Eve.

That's Odd ! I'm from Milwaukee too ! That's where my Mother happened to wind up after being shipped out of Nazi Germany, (alone, at the ripe old age of 15) and through Ellis Island in 1938 . . . . Just in time, before all hell broke loose ! She later discovered that all of her schoolmates slowly perished during the following 7 years. So I'm on this Forum now only because of someone's ForeThought back then.

Well, those foil wrapped St Nicholas Ginger Breads and Chocolates (like Pikes described) were a staple on St. Niick's Day.

We took gifts to our School Teacher (singular) on St. Nick's. With a Student Teacher Ratio of about 35 or 40 to 1 in Milwaukee, they must have made quite a haul!

Maybe St. Nick is hold up in Milwaukee, while Santa Claus hangs out at the North Pole.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 07:02 AM

I forget - did someone mention "addition" vs. "edition?"

Today I saw a house on the MLS "featuring a two-story edition."

Hmm.

Let's see...

"After putting a large addition on our ranch, we now have a two-story edition."

LOL
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 07:29 AM

Sew, that must be a Razed Ranch ?
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 07:31 AM

Your Write!!!
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 09:34 AM

Quote:
Maybe St. Nick is hold up in Milwaukee


Vermont, you should be ashamed of yourself. As the originator of this thread, you of all people should know that St. Nick might have been "holed up" in Milwaukee...or possibly "held up" (as in "delayed").

Holed up
1. To hibernate in or as if in a hole.
2. Informal To take refuge in or as if in a hideout.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 10:20 AM

Originally Posted By: neudot
Quote:
Maybe St. Nick is hold up in Milwaukee


Vermont, you should be ashamed of yourself. As the originator of this thread, you of all people should know that St. Nick might have been "holed up" in Milwaukee...or possibly "held up" (as in "delayed").

Holed up
1. To hibernate in or as if in a hole.
2. Informal To take refuge in or as if in a hideout.


HAHA! Thats embarassing!
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 10:28 AM

*SNICKER*
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 11:37 AM

You may have nailed me. I was thinking of St Nick as having retreated to Milwaukee as a last bastion of resistance where he could confront the "Santa Warriors";

or "Hold up" as in having barricaded oneself in a defensive position while the MLS Police have a Posse' out searching for you;

or Osama Bin Laden is Hold Up in the Himalayan Mountains . . . . but maybe that should always be "Holed Up". At least I didn't put in "wholed up" !

Now, I will have to go search the etymology of this small phrase which has decided to cause me such grief on March 4th.

I'm probably guilty as charged ! Isn't that something ? Two (2) simple mono-syllabic words. Now I feel just terrible.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 11:50 AM

admit it, you are nailed. it's HOLED up.

I know, it has to hurt.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 12:23 PM

We still love you Vermont. We love you four your efforts two keep the grammer correct.
Posted by: Don Price (Pine)

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 01:43 PM

Wow- this thread has my head spinning - does that mean it has affected my equilibrium and it may have an effect the rest of my day, or the other way around? confused
Posted by: FL_Agent

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/04/09 02:41 PM

Ok. So now it's out in the open...Vermont is not perfect. Pine, my equilibrium has been affected too and thank God my head stopped spinning. This is all very Phunny!
Posted by: TB in TX

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/20/09 03:05 PM

I had to bring this over from another forum - sorry, super realtor...

Originally Posted By: super realtor
Then later when it bites them in the butt they scream fowl.


CHICKEN!!! CHICKEN!!!
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/20/09 05:37 PM

Thanks, TB. I needed a little humor today!
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/26/09 10:27 AM

Here's a cute one, found elsewhere in a blog titled "10 signs it's time to move out."

"Your Batman obsession has lead to you to refer to your bedroom as 'The Layer,' except it is not that cool because it's actually the basement and your Mom does laundry there."

The bedroom should be referred to as the "lair"...unless it's referring to activity that might occur there.

Lair.."a secluded or hidden place, esp. a secret retreat or base of operations; a hideout or hideaway."
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/26/09 11:12 AM

hee hee hee

got an email from someone today who shared about her doctor's appointment. she said they took "3 viles" of blood. hee hee

Vials, honey. Vials.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/26/09 12:38 PM

I asked my son last night what he was doing and he responed "Just Shi%%ing her. You gotta love the speech impediment! At one point when asked what he wanted santa to bring him he wanted a f### (truck). His speech therapy is working though.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/11/09 12:05 PM

I realize that they are not homonyms; however people on this Forum have taken to using "then" and "than" interchangeably, in their writing, and probably also in their speech.

The word then is used to identify a specific point in time, or to identify the order or sequence of items or events, such as in -

"First I visit a Subject Property, take a few photos, and then I do the analysis to form an Opinion."

While the word than is a particle of speech used to introduce the 2nd element of a comparison, as in -

"Almost every other Firm pays more reliably than Evaluation Solutions."

Now, I won't say another word about them: "then" and "than". Then someone else may have more to say about the subject than I.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/26/09 04:50 PM

I thought they had all been touched on by us; but here's a set that suffered a little abuse this past week (right here on this Forum):

sew - What we sometimes do with a needle and thread;

so - In the manner shown; or to a certain extent like "so late";

sol - A musical note, right in between "fa" and "la" on the diatonic scale;

sow - The act of planting seeds; or maybe distributing Real Estate Marketing Literature in your "Farm Area".

Not too many homonyms have four (4) different meanings and four (4) different spellings for what is still the same pronunciation !
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/26/09 09:50 PM

In my neck of the woods CAPITAL and CAPITOL are tossed about quite often, both correctly and incorrectly. The former is a place or town, the latter a builing where legislation occurs. The Capitol Building is found in our nation's capital, Washington DC.
Posted by: Bigtoe

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/27/09 09:12 AM

Capital also refers to money and finances.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/27/09 09:18 AM

Originally Posted By: Bigtoe
Capital also refers to money and finances.


And upper case letters or is that Capitol.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/27/09 01:07 PM

Not sure about the case of the c. With the building in DC it would be a capital (upper case) C for Capitol, right? I suppose there is a nonspecific use too, such as, There are 23 captiol buildings that still don't have metal detectors.
Posted by: CanDo

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/28/09 02:02 AM

I actually know the answer to this one!!!

When referring to our nation's Capitol, the "C" is capitalized to indicate a noun (proper). Now what's that you're saying? The Capitol is a noun (thing), when speaking of a specific, then the rule is to capitalize. When speaking in the abstract and not a specific (ex: Various state capitols....) then no capitalization.

Off track here. When names end in z, for example, Fritz. The correct way to indicate plural is Fritz'. However, many times, incorrectly, the plural for words ending in z is to do this: Fritz's. Wrong, horrible wrong and sloppy to boot.

Have we touched on principle and principal yet?

What about stationary and stationery???

If I see one more reference to loose when the correct word is lose, I might just scream and even Vermont will be able to hear me (both the person and the State).

Sloppiness to the nth degree: irregardless. Really there is no such word, no matter what your dictionary may indicate (spell check for that matter).
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/28/09 06:57 AM

Originally Posted By: CanDo
If I see one more reference to loose when the correct word is lose, I might just scream and even Vermont will be able to hear me (both the person and the State).
I think we should authorize the Moderators to correct at least the Thread Titles to be using the proper forms. There's one Title floating around right now with the word "loosing"; and another about seeking "advise". The more often people see these incorrect forms, the more acceptable they become, and the greater the likelihood that they will be used incorrectly again, multiplying, like a virus.

I'm not aiming to enmbarrass the individual authors; but to nip these in the bud and prevent them from going off to wander endlessly throughout perpetuity "wrong". Hundreds of years from now, our descendants will read this stuff and laugh, saying that's the way they were back in the 21st Century . . . . What Dorks ! (Actually, they won't even know that we had existed!) Of course, not all Moderators would be good at this chore; so I'm really hesitant about suggesting ANY form of editing.

Mistakes are made by all of us; but this Forum allows us a whole 360 minutes to tidy up the spelling, grammar, punctuation, and proper word usage . . . . so haste is not an excuse here !
Originally Posted By: Cando
Have we touched on principle and principal yet?
Yes; see above; but there's much more to be said.
Originally Posted By: Cando
What about stationary and stationery?
I think ditto as per the Princes; but the problem persists.

All this nonsense about grammar is probably a lost cause; but I'm glad that there are a few who still pay attention. It's material that should have been covered in 3rd and 4th Grade . . . . so we're not talking about anything that is solely in the province of the highly educated. Sadly, it's pretty clear when someone who has a PhD was not paying attention in Grade School . . . . "It Shows !" and diminishes the respect they are given for their subsequent achievements.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/31/09 08:27 AM

These aren't quite homonyms, but they're being used interchangeably, when they shouldn't:

tach - short for tachometer; that gizmo on the dashboard that tells the RPM of your engine.

tack - small nail with a broad head; used before the invention of Post-Its to put notes on bulletin boards. Also used as an irritant when placed point-side-up on your 3rd Grade Teacher's Seat.

tact - short for a tactic or a strategic bargaining manuever or a ploy in negotiating a Real Estate Transaction (or parts thereof).
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/31/09 09:42 AM

I saw someone the other day mention a lady's "womanly wilds." I'm assuming that they meant wiles.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/31/09 10:42 AM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
I saw someone the other day mention a lady's "womanly wilds." I'm assuming that they meant wiles.


I've never heard that term. Can you use it in a sentence?
Posted by: jbentley

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/31/09 02:19 PM


Can you hold my purse whiles I try this on? LOL
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/31/09 05:25 PM

Originally Posted By: REODayton
Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
I saw someone the other day mention a lady's "womanly wilds." I'm assuming that they meant wiles.


I've never heard that term. Can you use it in a sentence?


a trick or stratagem intended to ensnare or deceive; also : a beguiling or playful trick

Her fainting spell was just another one of her wiles used to garner sympathy from others.

"Don't expect your womanly wiles to work on me," he stated when her lower lip began to tremble at his rebuke.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/01/09 10:08 AM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Originally Posted By: REODayton
Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
I saw someone the other day mention a lady's "womanly wilds." I'm assuming that they meant wiles.


I've never heard that term. Can you use it in a sentence?


a trick or stratagem intended to ensnare or deceive; also : a beguiling or playful trick

Her fainting spell was just another one of her wiles used to garner sympathy from others.

"Don't expect your womanly wiles to work on me," he stated when her lower lip began to tremble at his rebuke.


I assumed it was a sexual term!
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/01/09 10:41 AM

Originally Posted By: REODayton
I assumed it was a sexual term!

And to the extent that these wiles refer to the antics of a Coquette . . . . you are correct !
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/01/09 12:27 PM

Usually the types of women who resort to "wiles" to get what they want are very sexual indeed....and would certainly include sex (or the promise of) in their package of "wiles."
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/02/09 09:04 AM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Usually the types of women who resort to "wiles" to get what they want are very sexual indeed....and would certainly include sex (or the promise of) in their package of "wiles."



I see that. My wife wanted a dish washer and a garbage disposal, so I gave her a daughter and a son.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/02/09 11:51 AM

laugh
That was priceless, Dayton!
Posted by: jbentley

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/02/09 12:32 PM

You are bad Dayton!!
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/02/09 07:04 PM

I'll..a contraction of I will
Aisle..a row or space for walking with rows of seats on either side or with rows of seats.
Isle..land surounded by water

When I go to the movies in the Isle of Wight, I'll be certain not to trip down the aisle.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 09/14/09 07:24 PM

Here's another pair of words that is used interchangably - though they are not homonyms - just mis-used words . . . . from right here on this FORUM:

Mute - unable to speak, or unwilling to speak; refusing to enter a plea when arraigned before a Magistrate; a letter which is not pronounced; or a musical device used to muffle, or soften the tone of an instrument. Also, in art, to subdue the brightness or intensity of a color.

Moot - a subject of little or no consequence; discussed AFTER all meaningful decisions have already been made; strictly hypothetical . . . . like a Moot Court used for argument only.

Makes us look silly when the wrong one is used . . . . and we didn't even know it.


Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/19/10 07:57 AM

These phonetic equivalents wouldn't be here if I hadn't recently seen them mis-used:

Hall - a Noun: a large room for functions; or one that connects two or more other chambers. Shorty McGee was recently inducted into the BPO Hall of Fame for completing the most BPOs in a single day. Remember him; as Shorty is also listed in the Guinness Book of World Records !

Haul - a Verb: to transport, carry or drag, particularly for a Fee; or to change course, especially that of a Sailing Ship at Sea. Also as a Noun: the act of hauling or the subject of that effort, such as your catch of fish from a single pull of the net. When you first contemplate entering the field of Real Estate, do so only if you can stay for the Long Haul. It is an industry built on deferred gratification.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/20/10 09:58 AM

A recent Forum Post reminded me of an inquiry I had this past week:

"Does my Home Equity Loan have a Do on Sale Clause ?"

I thought we covered Do, Due and Dew earlier; but not really.

Dew - A Noun: morning condensation on cool surfaces;

Do - A Verb: to perform or carry out;

Due - An adjective: payable, or suitable and proper.

These are only one syllable; but people sure "do" mess them up.

I still like the phonetically correct question:

"How many daze until the Buyer's 2nd Deposit is dew? A two-fer!
Posted by: Patrishia Welch

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 11:40 AM

Because this FORUM is relied on as a site for novices to seek information from experts. It grieves me when people switch the two words:

People here often advise (verb) others who are seeking their advice (noun).
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 05:53 PM

It just must be that season; the season for violating Homonyms:

Who's - A contraction of "who is" such as in "Who's going to buy me dinner ?" or "Who's who in Real Estate ?" or Who's going to fix that BPO ?"

Whose - A Pronoun meaning belonging to whom, like in "Whose life is it anyhow ?" or "Whose responsibility is that ?"
Posted by: Patrishia Welch

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 06:48 PM

Choose and Chose
A lot and allot
Stationary and Stationery
Aisle and isle
Weather and whether
Weigh and way
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 07:12 PM

Did we mention ROLL and ROLE?

ROLL is an attendance list, or something you do to a ball, or something you eat with dinner.

ROLE is a part you play...a character, etc. Therefore, when you pretend you are someone else you are involved in "role play."

NOT "roll play."
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 08:17 PM

Originally Posted By: Patrishia Welch
Weigh and way

But don't forget:

Whey - the watery part of milk, and a bi-product of the cheese making process.

OR:

Originally Posted By: Patrishia Welch
Aisle and isle

I'll - The contraction of "I will"
Posted by: droll

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/22/10 08:35 PM

I was hesitant to be here... I thought a homonym was a nym with an alternate lifestyle!
OK, enough already..What about RAZE , RAYS, and RAISE?
Raze: To tear down, demolish
Raise: To elevate, build up
Rays: Sunlight, etc.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/23/10 12:08 PM

Ben- A name
Bin- A storage facility
Been- has occured
Posted by: Patrishia Welch

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/10 10:52 AM

Ones that annoy me when used improperly:

where, wear

here, hear

allowed, aloud

alter, altar

bare, bear

Best one though was spotted on my own MLS - dopey agent said that the property was by the water damn.



I hate it. I worked hard to learn this stuff in grammar school and I resent that others got away with not learning it. LOL
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/10 03:47 PM

They all annoy me when used improperly. I think the most annoying for me is there/their/they're.

A fun book to read is Eats, Shoots, and Leaves. It's a very entertaining book dedicated to the mangling of our language. LOL
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/26/10 05:01 PM

Ever read "The Dumbing Down of America" ?
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 11:33 AM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
They all annoy me when used improperly. I think the most annoying for me is there/their/they're.



I know, and sometimes I use them wrong on purpose! Sometimes I even say "I aint got know......" for the same reason.
Posted by: Don Price (Pine)

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 05:01 PM

Originally Posted By: Vermont
.........
Because this FORUM is relied on as a site for novices to seek information from experts. It grieves me when people switch the two words:

People here often advise (verb) others who are seeking their advice (noun).

........




Originally Posted By: Patrishia Welch
Because this FORUM is relied on as a site for novices to seek information from experts. It grieves me when people switch the two words:

People here often advise (verb) others who are seeking their advice (noun).


Patrishia's 4th copied post - and didn't even get it all - Sorry Vermont - wink


Originally Posted By: tired
Choose and Chose
A lot and allot
Stationary and Stationery
Aisle and isle
Weather and whether
Weigh and way



Originally Posted By: Patrishia Welch
Choose and Chose
A lot and allot
Stationary and Stationery
Aisle and isle
Weather and whether
Weigh and way



#5 - well - this is a newbie too - but maybe an original. Wouldn't it be funny to see Pat copy her copy wink


Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Ones that annoy me when used improperly:

where, wear

here, hear

allowed, aloud

alter, altar

bare, bear

Best one though was spotted on my own MLS - dopey agent said that the property was by the water damn.



I hate it. I worked hard to learn this stuff in grammar school and I resent that others got away with not learning it. LOL





Originally Posted By: Patrishia Welch
Ones that annoy me when used improperly:

where, wear

here, hear

allowed, aloud

alter, altar

bare, bear

Best one though was spotted on my own MLS - dopey agent said that the property was by the water damn.



I hate it. I worked hard to learn this stuff in grammar school and I resent that others got away with not learning it. LOL


#12

uh oh - the line has been drawn and crossed now - Perky violence is not the answer - LOL
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 07:58 PM

lol
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 08:09 PM

Does this count?

wink and smile
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 08:09 PM

Or

LOL and LMAO
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 08:44 PM

Ever read The Dumbing Down of America?

wink
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 08:50 PM

I have heard about it, though have not read it. It sounds like it is a good read. I should check it out.

I have watched the movie Idiocracy. I think we are close to being there.
Posted by: Don Price (Pine)

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/27/10 09:23 PM

Perky - are you taking a shot at me - or commenting on my posts - or a twofour wink
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/28/10 03:51 AM

I was just quoting Vermont, and taking credit for it. wink LOL
Posted by: Don Price (Pine)

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 02/28/10 08:58 PM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
I was just quoting Vermont, and taking credit for it. wink LOL


Oh - I understand, now - LOL
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/10/10 05:13 AM

Fair - As an Adjective meaning dispassionate or even-handed; not showing favoritism; being unbiased and impartial. As a Noun, a periodic festival or bazaar for entertainment and the exchange of goods.

I thought the price I indicated for that BPO was fair; even though the previous value was certainly a bit bizarre!

The fare charged to ride the subway seemed fair to me; but they don't allow Koala Bears to ride the rails.

I'm going to the Fair because they have a display of a Real Estate Agent feeding eucalyptus leaves to a Koala Bear, its standard fare. He earns more doing that than preparing BPOs, so it seems fair to the Agent.

Fare - A noun representing payment for transportation, or one of the paying passengers in, or on board a vehicle used for transportation, such as a taxi or a train; or to represent the regular diet of food. Also, as an intensive verb meaning to wander or just to happen.

How did Real Estate fare with Brad? It was okay until he got into BPOs. Fare thee well, Brad; Yes, Fare thee well! (I heard he supplements his BPO income by feeding eucalyptus leaves to Koala Bears!)

The standard fare for Koala Bears is eucalyptus leaves; while the standard fare for Brad is now strictly Big Macs.

I had three (3) Fares in my Taxi - Two Real Estate Agents and one Koala Bear. But, I charged for four fares seeing as the Koala left such a mess of partially chewed eucalyptus leaves. That only seemed fair. Now my Taxi will smell like menthol forever.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/14/10 05:00 PM

Assistance - A Noun meaning the “act” of assisting OR the actual help rendered.

Assistants - A group of people who serve in subordinate positions and aid or help in accomplishing a task.

I was overwhelmed and needed some assistance, so I ran a Help Wanted Ad in order to hire me some Assistants on all of my miscellaneous BPO tasks.

I hired multiple helpers: a BPO FEE Negotiator; a BPO Photographer; a multi-tasking Comp Selection Specialist; one basic Comment Maker-Upper; a BPO Security Detail for protection; a Broad-Band Data Entry Expert; a Quality Control Fender-Offer; and, of course, a BPO Historical Archivist.

So now I have plenty of Assistants assisting me with their assistance on every aspect of the ever-exciting BPO endeavor !

Actually, I made most of that part up. Some days I could use a little Assistance; but I haven't really hired any Assistants ! I think people would just get in my way.

Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/14/10 07:44 PM

ax-wood splitting tool, can be red if you're a fireman
axe-use of an ax to chop
acts-behaviors or parts of a play or story
tax-what the goverment collects from you to pay for stuff
tacks-pointy things to hold stuff on a wall or sailing direction
tact's-this is a stretch...but the contracted form of 'tact' and 'is' As in , "I would like to be a diplomat. Must I know what to say and when to say it? Yes, tact's required to be a diplomat."
sax-short for saxaphone
sacks-bags
Saks- Short form for an upscale store
sex-gender
sects-religious groups
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 03/21/10 06:00 AM

Some people love to axe questions.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/07/10 09:18 PM

parquet: a floor composed of short strips or blocks of wood forming a pattern, sometimes with inlays of other woods or other materials.

Parkay: a margarine made by ConAgra Foods (previously Kraft). It is available in spreadable, sprayable and squeezeable forms. Starting in 1973, a commercial was made for Parkay called "the talking tub", in which the tub first says "butter" when someone nearby says "Parkay", then says "Parkay" once someone says "butter".

"Be careful not to get Parkay on the parquet!"
"Butter!"
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/10 08:00 AM

I can't believe it's not butter.

Good one.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/10 09:39 AM

Everything tastes better with Blue Bonnet on it. Even parquet flooring.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/10 10:27 AM

Bo- a nickname for Roberta or Robert
Bow- weapon or ribbon
Beau- a male escort for a girl
BO- unpleasant smell associatred with a lack of hygiene


Since he had refused to bathe his BO had become unbearable; Samantha found herself a new beau. However, Bo, terribly disenchanted, loaded his bow, determined to get revenge.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/10 10:41 AM

Sounds like you've got the makings for a good Medieval Soap Opera.

Of course, in Medieval times, B.O. was the dominant Perfume Du Jour (just our natural pheromones) because we didn't yet have Soap or Opera, or T.V. . . . necessary to indoctrinate humans into believing in artificial odors and then advertising which ones to buy.

Then came Zest and Irish Spring, made out of crushed Leprechauns and 4 Leafed Clovers, and thereafter, the whole world changed.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/10 08:32 AM

Here's a set we have not discussed.

yore - an archaic way of referring to "the past"

you're - a contraction of the words "you are"

your - an adjective describing something belonging to "you"

This set gets screwed up so often, I find it hard to believe we haven't already disgust it, but we haven't! (Look for the hidden clue to yet another set.)

Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/10 12:01 PM

Disgust and discussed

Was that it?
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/10 03:04 PM

Originally Posted By: Doin' bpose
Disgust and discussed

Was that it?

Yes, you got it !

It was with great disgust that we discussed disgust !

I guess it's a case where you have to see it to believe it!
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/29/10 08:28 PM

aid to assist
ade a cool citrus drink
aide a helper

The head lifeguard sipped her cool ade outside the Aid station awaiting her aide.


ale beer
ail to hurt

The tardy assistant quaffed his ail at the bar, suddenly aware his boss would make him ail for being late again.

rein a strap, often of leather, designed to hold a bit and direct a horse
rain precipitation
reign duration of royal rule

Back at the Aid station rain drops began to fall, clearing the beach. The head lifeguard ended her reign temporarily, closing the station. She grabbed her reins and headed to the stables.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/10 07:41 AM

Meant to write he quaffed his ale.
Posted by: ditty

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/30/10 03:12 PM

Oh...so this is where all the beer drinkers are...LOL
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/03/10 09:03 PM

Did we discuss "except" and "accept?"

I chose to accept all the gifts except that one.

Also, ran across this today:

wave, waive

waive: To give up (a claim or right) voluntarily; relinquish
wave: seriously, you need a definition?

I am going to waive riding the waves today...wave to me as you go by!
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/04/10 07:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
Did we discuss "except" and "accept?"

We did; but that didn't cure the problem, did it?

Same thing with advise and advice . . . . as we still have advicers dispensing advise.

Today, I wanted to cry when I read about a two-teared balcony overlooking the lake. I have to figure out how to diplomatically explain that a multi-level structure has multiple "tiers". It's nothing to cry over; but I'm sure the Author will be angry. And I'm not going to shed a "tear" over it.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/04/10 08:25 AM

I, eye, aye.

The aging senator nudged his elbow into his youthful neighbor's left bicep and pointed with his chin toward the sinewy yet voluptuous new intern. "I got my eye on her," he mumbled under his breath. While twisting his gold wedding band and looking for another place to sit, the younger senator responded to the matter at hand and voiced his vote for the legislation, "Aye."
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/04/10 06:26 PM

Another Post regarding Chalets just reminded me of a humorous situation sort of related to homonyms.

I was selling a larger parcel of raw land for some foreign investors. It was about 280 Acres of Timber with great Views and Cascading Brooks and Steep Outcroppings of Moss Covered Granite . . . . but very remote.

At the Closing, and to break the ice a little, the Buyer felt comfortable in asking the Two Sellers what their original intentions were when they bought the big parcel.

One of the Sellers chose to speak on behalf of both of them "We were going to built a few dozen Shallots to rent out to people for vacations", and the other Seller nodded in approval.

Not one of the Attorneys present, nor the Buyer who asked the question, ever asked for clarification. They all just took the answer into deep contemplation. I thought that was a nice moment.

So now, every time I'm in the Produce Department and see Shallots, I think of those Chalets that never got built.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/04/10 10:09 PM

I'm tellin' ya, you have to write a book.
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/08/10 09:03 PM

Dentil - one of a series of small projecting rectangular blocks forming a molding especially under a cornice

Dental - referring to teeth

The historic home features dentil moulding around the dining room ceiling.


NOT DENTAL MOULDING!!!!
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/08/10 10:18 PM

Or dental molding!
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/09/10 02:05 AM

Unless, of course, you are being fitted for a crown, or dentures, or the like.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 08/09/10 03:08 AM

People should eat more ruffage if they start suffering from mold on their teeth.

Until now, I had frequently wondered what that greenish tinge was on the teeth of certain prospects, and so now I know . . . . why it's Dental Mold! Quite becoming.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 10/27/10 06:29 PM

chord - three tones in harmony. This is also the kind of Chord you strike when you get a quick response from someone in your audience. That little quip about people living beyond their means certainly struck a responsive chord with the former Owner of that REO property.

cord - a very light rope, or an electrical wire. Also a measure of firewood (4' X 4' X 8'). While doing an Interior BPO in an REO, he tripped over a lamp cord in the dark, and fell down the basement stairs . . . . soiling his clothing.

cored - divested of its central part. Like an Apple or Pineapple. When he took the Listing, he simply cloned the MLS data of the prior Listing, without looking at it. The subsequent lawsuit cored his plans for an early retirement.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 10/27/10 08:17 PM

I never thought of the word "cored" in any sense other than to core an apple. How interesting!
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 03:01 PM

PEEKED, PIQUED
The package sufficiently piqued my interest; I peeked!

piqued, piqu·ing, piques
1. To cause to feel resentment or indignation.
2. To provoke; arouse
3. To pride (oneself)

peeked, peek·ing, peeks
1. To glance quickly.
2. To look or peer furtively, as from a place of concealment.
3. To be only partially visible, as if peering or emerging from hiding.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 03:32 PM

Those go along with Peak, peaking, peaked

Like Mountain Summits; Roof Ridge Lines, or Market Tops like in:

Although there was plenty of warning that the Real Estate Bubble would ultimately burst, when the Market was actually peaking in 2005-2006, few economists were willing to recognize it . . . . until it was too late.

No one predicted the exact peak.

Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 03:50 PM

And peaked... pee-ked: having a sickly appearance
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 05:28 PM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
And peaked... pee-ked: having a sickly appearance
Correct-O !

It's true. Many of the Real Estate Market Prognosticators do look somewhat peaked, having failed to identify the Market Peak, and are now standing in the same Bread Lines as those other Former Home Owners who have experienced Foreclosure.

This Real Estate peak has a Downslope as well as an Upslope . . . . the only difference is it took much less time to descend the Downslope than it did to ascend the Upslope.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 08:15 PM

Tow- to pull something.

Toe- Parts of my feet



Feet- My feet


Feat- a notable achievement.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 09:13 PM

Bussed......verb past tense of bus or to move in a bus.

Bust.......verb to break, noun, bosom, or head statue.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 11/04/10 09:57 PM

REO. That. Is. Disgusting.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/20/11 11:50 AM

pray - to worship God; or to ask for help and guidance

prey - to hunt or seek out; to take advantage of

praise - (in certain forms) to commend, to extol . . . . even to eulogize

He's always praying for more BPOs; but then cursing the QC that comes along with them.

Some of the BPO firms prey upon the desperate Agents; others go after the wishful thinking and the naive.

Just hoping and praying for your check will not put it in the mailbox. I try to praise those firms who cough up the money without being hounded.

The best form of referral is when my former Customers and Clients praise me. Others say "he" preys on the weak and those who are inattentive. Both are probably accurate.

I'm praying for more of the former than the latter . . . . but right now, I'll deal with either.

You see, I don't prey on any specific type of Customer; I believe in equal opportunity preying. That's just the kind of guy I am !
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/20/11 12:04 PM

weekend

weakened
Posted by: ditty

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/20/11 01:33 PM

Im thinkin...how to weakened my weekend...Ill come up with some thing...
Posted by: jsteinhomes

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/29/11 07:29 AM

It amazes me how many people still mess up "there, their, they're" after Vermont's numerous attempts to set them upon the righteous path he's laid out for them.

I'm glad you are all here so I am not the only one going crazy over grammatical ineptitude.

How about "fare/fair"?
Posted by: ditty

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/29/11 11:25 AM

LOL....when you say fair...I think county fair...some how I do not think that is what you had in mind...
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/29/11 09:13 PM

Wurst- The ground meat sausage.
Worse- More Bad.



Really only refers to hill people and carney folk though.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/30/11 10:52 AM

holy-sacred, divine
wholly-entirely, fully
holey-full of holes
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/02/11 06:36 AM

Time for a bump:

Spotted on the MLS: "The basement has ruffed plumbing for a 3rd bath." Really? Are there starchy, lacy ruffles adorning the PVC?

Oh, I see, you meant "roughed."

Yessiree, we is perfeshonal.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/02/11 07:08 AM

lightening to make lighter or brighter or an occurance during pregnancy
lightning A sharp discharge of electricity in the atmosphere.
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/02/11 07:25 AM

good one!!!!
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/07/11 02:13 PM

^^^Thanks.

I have another one. I am proud to share this one. Came across it learning to tie knots for my son's birthday party.

bite Chomp or chew
byte 1 piece of electronic data (datum) or information
bight a hoop or bend formed in the middle of a rope when the ends are brought together
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/07/11 06:49 PM

A "bight" can also refer to a geologic indentation in a coastline, such as the Southern California Bight, the Key West Bight, or the New York Bight (aka Doodletown Bight). I think there are also several "bights" up and down the Mississippi, caused by odd currents.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/07/11 07:46 PM

Interesting. I guess since many knots are nautical the coastline thing could have 'ties' that way. Just guessing.

Does anyone know if there is a Bight, ME?
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/07/11 09:10 PM

Originally Posted By: Doin' bpose
Does anyone know if there is a Bight, ME?
I guess there's a Bight in the Gulf of Maine, near Vinalhaven, so that ought to qualify.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/10/11 01:51 PM

Scalene--a class of triangles with 3 different length sides and 3 different angles.

Scaling--climbing the outer surface of a wall of cliff.
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/10/11 05:06 PM

Originally Posted By: Doin' bpose
Scalene--a class of triangles with 3 different length sides and 3 different angles.

Scaling--climbing the outer surface of a wall of cliff.


Who the heck uses scalene in every day conversation or mispell scaling for schalene?
Posted by: Greg Phillips

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/11/11 01:20 PM

College students? People that go on Jeopardy?
Posted by: REODayton

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/11/11 04:19 PM

Originally Posted By: Greg Phillips
College students? People that go on Jeopardy?


I watch Jeopardy almost every day and I aint got to ever hear of that word.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/11/11 07:50 PM

Originally Posted By: REODayton
Originally Posted By: Greg Phillips
College students? People that go on Jeopardy?


I watch Jeopardy almost every day and I aint got to ever hear of that word.
Come on bro. all the easy ones are gone. It's like page 38 of the thread. I gotta look in the cracks and crevices to find these things. The word is not as uncommon as you are implying really. It's in 4th grade math books and the kids get it again in HS.

Picked it up helping Junior with school work the other day.
Posted by: Grampa

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/24/11 12:03 PM

Doin',

I am impressed that you are able to help your 4th grader with math. You would be amazed how many parents can not do that.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/24/11 12:37 PM

Originally Posted By: Grampa
Doin',

I am impressed that you are able to help your 4th grader with math. You would be amazed how many parents can not do that.
Thanks--let's just say it is learning experince for the both of us.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/24/11 03:45 PM

Well, here we are out in front of an Apartment House I once sold:

I think this one is just like other tenets that I know aren't really homonyms; but the principle is still the same . . . . isn't it?

We hold these truths to be self-evident, and we park them here.

Maybe it's just a private joke between the Occupants and the Landlord; and I don't really know who drafted the sign . . . . but I guess it's working because no non-tenets were parked there.
Posted by: jducey

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/01/11 08:20 PM

There always telling me their is problem with that they're homonym
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/07/11 07:51 PM

And now it's time for Guess Those Homonyms. No Whammies. Identifiy the 3 images you might win a big prize. Good luck and thank you for playing.





Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/07/11 08:34 PM

Okay, it's a Tutor; a Tooter . . . . and a Tudor.

So do I get a Psychic Trophy ?
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/07/11 08:54 PM

Originally Posted By: Vermont
Okay, it's a Tutor; a Tooter . . . . and a Tudor.

So do I get a Psychic Trophy ?
Vermont Wins! Well played. I am sending a mental image of the prize now. It may already be in your fridge...enjoy.


(see it can be whatever late night treat you wish. An adult beverage, ice cream, a snack, etc.)
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/11 10:57 AM

THat's a GREAT IDEA Doin'!!!!!!! What fun!
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/11 02:05 PM

Originally Posted By: Perky_REALTOR
THat's a GREAT IDEA Doin'!!!!!!! What fun!
Thanks Perky. It was fun putting it together. I owe it to the kids at dinner for the idea of the words, except for tudor which was my addition. Tooter took another meaning, which I cleaned up for the forum.

I went ahead and blogged it too.

It added to the fun of Vermont's thread a little.
Posted by: Alabama Homes

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 06/08/11 02:54 PM

You guys are too funny and the "TENENT PARKING ONLY" is priceless

Check out www.theredneckrealter.com
Posted by: brooksamanda89

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 05:41 AM

The term used for such words is called homonyms. Here is a list of some of the common homonyms:-

1. aid – to help or assist, aide – assistant
2. allowed – permitted, aloud – out loud
3. bear – grizzly animal, beer – drinks
4. bite – nibble, byte – 8 bits (computer data)
5. gorilla – big ape, guerrilla – warrior
6. feat – achievement, feet – plural of foot
7. flea – small biting insect, flee - run
8. forth – onward, fourth – number four
9. weak – not strong, week –seven days
10. rain – water from sky, rein – bridle
11. affect – change, effect – result or consequence
12. ate – chewed up and swallowed, eight – number after seven
13. beach – sandy shore, beech – type of tree
14. boar – pig, bore – to drill
15. flour – powdery, ground up grain, flower – blooming plant
16. fir – type of tree, fur – animal hair
17. flew – did fly, flu – illness
18. knew – did know, new – not old
19. which – that, witch – sorcerer
20. principal – most important, principle – belief
Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 06:32 AM

OK.
Posted by: droll

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 07:36 AM

I don't think "beer" and "bear" are pronounced the same, even here in the deep south! "Witch" and "which" are not either.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 07:43 AM

If someone really needs a comprehensive list, here's Alan Cooper's list of 706 sets of homonyms that I posted three years ago when starting this thread:

Alan Cooper's List of Homonyms

Still the most complete list out there . . . . even though I've found a few omissions.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 08:24 AM




Posted by: Perky_REALTOR

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 08:34 AM

I pronounce which and witch the same. lol
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 07/14/11 08:55 AM

Oh my goodness, it's Jam (like in Jelly); and

Jamb . . . . like in a Door Jamb, or Casing.

When the going gets tough, the tough get going !
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/06/13 10:01 AM



For Vermont, in particular, and the rest of us who care about such things.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/06/13 12:16 PM

Originally Posted By: neudot
For Vermont, in particular, and the rest of us who care about such things.

Thank you; but I'm pretty much reconciled to the fact that it's a losing cause.

Soon we'll all be communicating with just a series of miscellaneous grunts, interspersed with the frequent insertion of fillers, or place holders, such as "you know", "okay", "like", "I mean", "uummm", "well", and "kind'a"; all of which seem to already consume more syllables than the actual message.

I used to think it's you and me against the world; but now . . . . I don't know if you can even count on me.

I recently sat in on a lecture by a local Natural Resources Attorney, whose One Hour "prepared" speech contained 247 "you knows". Almost as good as Caroline Kennedy!

Thanks again for the cartoon !
Posted by: PA Roadkill

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 04:50 AM

I got an email from an asset manager last week asking if I thought they should "except" an offer. Luckily I knew they meant "accept"
Posted by: neudot

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 07:35 AM

I used to get assignment letters from a certain asset manager who closed her correspondence with the word, "Respectively," It always gave me a chuckle. I pointed out to her one time that she probably meant, "Respectfully,"

She never changed it.
Posted by: Vermont

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 08:03 AM

Originally Posted By: neudot
She never changed it.

You can lead a horse to water . . . .

but you can't make him float on his back.

(She probably changed the closing for everyone except you, just to be a contrarian).
Posted by: DueDiligence

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 12:06 PM

Originally Posted By: Vermont
Originally Posted By: neudot
For Vermont, in particular, and the rest of us who care about such things.

Thank you; but I'm pretty much reconciled to the fact that it's a losing cause.

Soon we'll all be communicating with just a series of miscellaneous grunts, interspersed with the frequent insertion of fillers, or place holders, such as "you know", "okay", "like", "I mean", "uummm", "well", and "kind'a"; all of which seem to already consume more syllables than the actual message.

I used to think it's you and me against the world; but now . . . . I don't know if you can even count on me.

I recently sat in on a lecture by a local Natural Resources Attorney, whose One Hour "prepared" speech contained 247 "you knows". Almost as good as Caroline Kennedy!

Thanks again for the cartoon !


When I read my email from my atty, I cringe. When I've read some of his pleadings, I don't know what to say. It's not only grammar and spelling, it's the ability to communicate a position.

It's true, we're getting to the point where people are barely bearly barley able to communicate their thoughts. Gets really bad when attys can't write and you think about all the Bills being written in Washington.
Posted by: Doin' bpose

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 10:04 PM

Has anyone ever watched the movie Idiocracy?
Posted by: DueDiligence

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/07/13 10:50 PM

Originally Posted By: Doin' bpose
Has anyone ever watched the movie Idiocracy?


Yes. It is here.
Posted by: 12 step 4 BPOs?

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 05/10/15 04:47 PM

another very useful guide:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Gv0H-vPoDc
Posted by: Long Walk

Re: HOMONYMS - There, Their, and They're - 01/26/18 12:48 AM

I have skimmed this thread at least once and thought all the homonyms were fully explored. It may be that I missed this, but Vermont pointed out one that I am not sure has been covered.

Council and counsel.

From my usage, one is a body of folks in some type of oversight or governmental role, and the other is advice or, more commonly, another name for an attorney.

It was a good catch, but I tend to think it was caused by auto-correct...especially because it was written by a poster who knows what he is doing.